Little Rock Culture Vulture

Cultural events, places and people in the Little Rock area

Human Rights along U.S./Mexico border topic of Clinton School address today at noon

UACSIn the summer of 2014, the headlines were dominated with stories about human rights issues at the border between the US and Mexico.  While the headlines may have faded, the issue has not.  Today at noon at the Clinton School, Chelsea Halstead will discuss “The Human Rights Crisis on the U.S. Mexico Border.”

Chelsea Halstead is a program manager for the Colibrí Center for Human Rights where she leads the Colibrí’s Family Advocacy program, speaking with families to collect information on missing persons and making case matches by comparing reports to forensic data.

The Colibrí Center is a family advocacy nonprofit based in Tucson, Arizona that works with families, forensic scientists and humanitarians to end migrant death on the U.S.-Mexico border.  The three major avenues for fulfilling their mission are: family advocacy, arts & storytelling, policy reform.

Halstead is an Arizona native. She grew up in Flagstaff and moved to Tucson in 2008 to earn her B.A. in Geography from the University of Arizona. After studying and working for a year in Guatemala, Chelsea returned to complete her senior honors thesis which explored humanitarian border activism and migrant death. After graduating in 2012, she worked as a Research Assistant for a Department of Justice-funded study investigating the practices, protocols, and procedures associated with the handling of migrant remains along the border.

In 2013, she was selected for a Humanity in Action Fellowship in Berlin. Soon after completing her fellowship, Chelsea joined the Colibrí Center for Human Rights, first as a volunteer and later as Program Manager. She currently heads Colibrí’s Family Advocacy program, speaking with families to collect information on missing persons and making case matches by comparing reports to forensic data. Chelsea also works to build relationships between Colibrí and various partners across the region.

Colibrí’s Executive Director, Robin Reineke and Forensic Anthropologist, Dr. Bruce Anderson, first began this work in 2006 as the Missing Migrant Project at the Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner. In 2013, Robin Reineke and William Masson co-founded the Colibrí Center for Human Rights to expand the Missing Migrant Project and create a more comprehensive effort for the entire U.S.-Mexico border.

The program will begin at 12noon at the Clinton School of Public Service.

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Author: Scott

A cultural thinker with a life long interest in the arts and humanities: theatre, music, architecture, photography, history, urban planning, etc.

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