On stage at South on Main tonight (5/17) – Dead Horses and Benjamin Jaffe

Join South on Main for an evening of indie folk music with Dead Horses and Benjamin Jaffe, of HONEYHONEY, on Friday, May 17.

Benjamin Jaffe will open the show at 9 pm. Purchase advance tickets for $10 or pay a $12 cover day of show. Tickets do not guarantee you a seat. Please call (501) 244-9660 to reserve a table. Guests must purchase advance ticket to confirm your table reservation.

ABOUT DEAD HORSES
At fifteen, Dead Horses frontwoman Sarah Vos’ world turned upside down. Raised in a strict, fundamentalist home, Vos lost everything when she and her family were expelled from the rural Wisconsin church where her father had long served as pastor. What happened next is the story of Dead Horses’ stunning new album, My Mother the Moon, a record full of trauma and triumph, despair and hope, pain and resilience.

Blending elements of traditional roots with contemporary indie folk, Dead Horses writes music that is both familiar and unexpected, unflinchingly honest in its portrayal of modern American life, yet optimistic in its unshakable faith in brighter days to come.

Described by NPR Music as “evocative, empathetic storytelling,” My Mother the Moon earned a spot in No Depression’s “Best Roots Music Albums of 2018” list, and Rolling Stone Country declared the Wisconsin-based duo an “Artist You Need to Know.”

Listen: deadhorses.net/music

ABOUT BENJAMIN JAFFE
Years before he hit the road as one half of the Americana duo HONEYHONEY, Benjamin Jaffe kickstarted his career as a solo artist. He was a young Massachusetts native living in Los Angeles, rolling his sharp songwriting, multi-instrumental chops and vocals into songs that were honest and experimental. A decade later, he returns to that career with Oh, Wild Ocean of Love his first full-length release as a solo artist.

Trading the rootsy stomp of HONEYHONEY’s three albums for an indie-alternative sound, Jaffe widens his approach with Oh, Wild Ocean of Love. These songs make room for a broad range of influences, from the polyphonic rhythms and improvisational freedom of jazz music to the soul and swagger of Motown. There are R&B ballads like “Everlasting Peace,” where Jaffe layers his voice into gorgeous stacks of multi-part harmony, and dissonant rockers like “Dominator,” where he shines a light on his skills as an inventive electric guitarist. Throughout the tracklist, Jaffe plays nearly every instrument himself, bouncing between drums, keyboards, bass, and guitar.

Advertisements