Little Rock Culture Vulture

Cultural events, places and people in the Little Rock area

Little Rock Look Back: SOUTH PACIFIC wins Pulitzer Prize

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On May 5, 1950, the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical South Pacific captured the Pulitzer Prize in Drama. This would receive special attention in the Arkansas Gazette. The reason this carried such weight in Arkansas was that the musical had a connection to Little Rock.
The 1950 Pulitzer for Drama went to a musical, for only the second time in the history of the awards. The recipient was South Pacific by Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II and Joshua Logan. The character was the leading lady of Nellie Forbush. She was an Navy ensign and a nurse stationed on an exotic island during World War II. The musical was based on a Pulitzer Prize winning novel, James Michener’s Tales of the South Pacific.

In the Michener novel, Miss Forbush is not from Little Rock. She is actually from a small town in Alabama. The part was written for Mary Martin from Weatherford, Texas. Rodgers, Hammerstein & Logan did not discuss why they relocated Nellie’s birthplace.

Originally the musical contained a song entitled “My Girl Back Home” in which Nellie sang of being from “Little Rock, A-R-K” while another character sang of being from “Philadelphia, P-A” and “Princeton, N-J.” It is possible the change to Little Rock was made because it offered more lyrical possibilities, but that is only a supposition on the part of the Culture Vulture. That song did appear in the movie version in which Mitzi Gaynor played Nellie Forbush. It was also featured in the 2008 Broadway revival, this time with Kelli O’Hara playing Nellie.

In the musical, Nellie struggles with her own prejudices. This issue of prejudice became an instance of fact meeting fiction. In 1957, a few weeks after Eisenhower sent troops into Little Rock to ensure that Central High would be desegregated, a production of South Pacific on Long Island was temporarily halted when the audience booed and yelled after Nellie mentioned she was from Little Rock. Interestingly, the movie was released in 1958, but retained references to Little Rock. That was either a testament to the expense of re-editing it, or the fact that audience reaction had lessened.

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Author: Scott

A cultural thinker with a life long interest in the arts and humanities: theatre, music, architecture, photography, history, urban planning, etc.

One thought on “Little Rock Look Back: SOUTH PACIFIC wins Pulitzer Prize

  1. I recall when the fine singing talent, Robert Goulet came to Little Rock and performed at Robinson Auditorium in a production of ‘South Pacific.’ He was surpurb.

    In the neighborhood of Georgetown, across the river from Washington, D.C., a small business area hosted a contest. They were choosing the subject matter for a large mural for the commercial district. This artwork would be hhighly visible on the second story of a building that faced a highly trafficed street and bridge.

    Did the populace choose Ben Franklin? Ronnie Reagan? Sitting Bull?

    NOPE — they chose a close-up of the face of Marilyn Monro.e Evidentially everyone STILL loves the mural after several decades.

    I mention this as I have long thought downtown Little Rock should have a mural on the side of the empty bldg. across from the Bankruptcy Courts bldg. I wanted it to be either Mary Martin costumed as the character Nellie Forbush from ‘South Pacific;’ OR Jane Russell and Marilyn Monroe in their sparkling crimson, girly-girl costumes whey they sing lyrics about being ‘A Little Girl from Little Rock’ in ‘Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend.’
    Either production chosen for the mural could have an added decorative ribbon at the bottom, briefly explaining
    the storyline and hence, the reason for the subject matter.
    I am betting either musical production / song choice / beautiful women would be a monster hit — with locals as
    well as tourists. It also makes a bit more sense than a mural of goldfish, koi carp or the dancing veggies mural
    over on South Main.