Women Making History – Dr. Sybil Jordan Hampton

Dr. Sybil Jordan Hampton made history as the first African American student to attend each high school year at and graduate from Little Rock Central High School.  But her impact on history exceeds that and extends into classrooms throughout Arkansas.

After a career which took her from elementary classrooms to corporate boardrooms, Dr. Hampton returned to Little Rock in 1996 to become the President of the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation.  In that capacity, she oversaw many opportunities to broaden the ways the arts and humanities were used in classrooms and outside of classrooms.  Dr. Hampton led the WRF until her retirement in 2006.  Through her vision and leadership, many tens of thousands of dollars of support went to cultural institutions and organizations during her decade at the helm.

In the mid-2000s, following the unexpected death of the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra’s executive director, Dr. Hampton served as acting executive director of the ASO while a national search could be conducted.  She had long been a supporter of the ASO and other cultural institutions as a patron.

During the Central High Integration 60th Anniversary, Dr. Hampton served as emcee of the Commemoration Ceremony.  A few months later, she received one of the LRCH Tiger Foundation’s first Award of Excellence. She has also been honored by inclusion in the Arkansas Civil Rights Heritage Trail and the Arkansas Black Hall of Fame.

She continues to be involved with Little Rock’s cultural life through her involvement in the Mount Holly Cemetery Association. She is a tireless advocate for this living museum of Little Rock’s past.

Last year, she was was interviewed by The HistoryMakers.  Recently, she was featured at Robinson Center when the public radio program “The Moth” recorded a show there.  L

 

15 Highlights of 2015 – Recital featuring restored 1927 Steinway at Central High

 In September, the LRCH Tiger Foundation and Little Rock Central High School hosted a recital to celebrate the successful completion of the renovation of the 1927 Steinway & Sons grand piano.
It took place in the Roosevelt Thompson Auditorium at the school. The concert was free and open to the public and all were welcome.

The recital showcased the variety of music that has been played on the Model A III Steinway over the past 88 years. The piano was purchased for the school when it opened in September 1927. Over the years, it had fallen into disrepair and been improperly maintained. 

Due to the efforts of the Tiger Foundation (led by project chair Julie Keller), LRCHS Principal Nancy Rousseau and choral director Scott Whitfield, money was raised to restore the piano. A new onsite storage facility was also completed, paid for by donations.  

At the concert, it was announced that the piano would now be named “Scott” in honor of Mr. Whitfield. 

The $38,000 restoration project was undertaken by Mike Anderson of Anderson’s Piano Clinic who assembled a team of experts from Arkansas and Texas.

The Tiger Foundation is led by a 21-member board of dedicated volunteers, many of whom are Central alumni, who are passionate about the continued growth and success of Little Rock Central High School.

Recital featuring restored 1927 Steinway at Central High this afternoon

Photo courtesy of LRCH Tiger Foundation

The LRCH Tiger Foundation and Little Rock Central High School are hosting a recital this afternoon at 2pm to celebrate the successful completion of the renovation of the 1927 Steinway & Sons grand piano.

It will take place in the Roosevelt Thompson Auditorium at the school. The concert is free and open to the public and all are welcome.

The recital will showcase the variety of music that has been played on the Model A III Steinway over the past 88 years.  The piano was purchased for the school when it opened in September 1927.  Over the years, it had fallen into disrepair and been improperly maintained.  Due to the efforts of the Tiger Foundation (led by project chair Julie Keller), LRCHS Principal Nancy Rousseau and choral director Scott Whitfield, money was raised to restore the piano.

The $38,000 restoration project was undertaken by Mike Anderson of Anderson’s Piano Clinic who assembled a team of experts from Arkansas and Texas.

The Tiger Foundation is led by a 21-member board of dedicated volunteers, many of whom are Central alumni, who are passionate about the continued growth and success of Little Rock Central High School.