LR Culture Vulture turns 7

The Little Rock Culture Vulture debuted on Saturday, October 1, 2011, to kick off Arts & Humanities Month.

The first feature was on the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra, which was kicking off its 2011-2012 season that evening.  The program consisted of Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 4 in A, Op. 90, Rossini’s, Overture to The Italian Girl in Algiers, Puccini’s Chrysanthemums and Respighi’s Pines of Rome.  In addition to the orchestra musicians, there was an organ on stage for this concert.

Since then, there have been 10,107 persons/places/things “tagged” in the blog.  This is the 3,773rd entry. (The symmetry to the number is purely coincidental–or is it?)  It has been viewed over 288,600 times, and over 400 readers have made comments.  It is apparently also a reference on Wikipedia.

The most popular pieces have been about Little Rock history and about people in Little Rock.

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Legacies and Lunch at Butler Center at noon today (5/2)

The Butler Center’s monthly Legacies & Lunch program is today.

The speaker is Holly Hope, Special Projects Historian for the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program.  Her topic is “A Storm Couldn’t Tear Them Down: The Mixed Masonry Buildings of Silas Owens, Sr., 1938-1955”

Silas Owens, Sr. from Twin Groves, Arkansas was a farmer and self-taught rock mason who most notably produced buildings constructed in what the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program coined Mixed Masonries. These were cut stone buildings trimmed with brick. Owens introduced an artistry to a vernacular form that is unmatched and makes them easily recognizable.

Legacies & Lunch is free,  and open to the public. Programs are held from noon-1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. Attendees are invited to bring a sack lunch; drinks and dessert are provided. For more information, contact 918-3033.

Sandwich in History at Waldo E. Tiller House today at noon

ahpp WaldoTillerHouseThe Arkansas Historic Preservation Program’s next “Sandwiching in History” tour will visit the Waldo E. Tiller House at 35 Sherrill Road in Little Rock beginning at noon today, (March 4).

Completed in 1954, the Tiller House was designed by Little Rock architect Dietrich Neyland, who worked for the firm of Ginocchio, Cromwell & Associates. The home’s modern design was inspired by the work of Neyland’s mentor, internationally-known architect Richard Neutra. Waldo Tiller was president of the Tiller Tie & Lumber Company. He also served as president and later, executive secretary, of the Arkansas Forestry Association. The Tiller House was remodeled in 2007 to provide necessary updates while preserving the home’s unique, Mid-Century Modern character.

The “Sandwiching in History” tour series targets Pulaski County structures and sites. The noontime series includes a brief lecture and tour of the subject property. Participants are encouraged to bring their lunches with them. The American Institute of Architects offers one HSW continuing education learning unit credit for members who attend a “Sandwiching in History” tour.

The tour is free and open to the public. For information, call the AHPP at (501) 324-9880, write the agency at 323 Center St., Suite 1500, Little Rock, AR 72201, send an e-mail message to info@arkansaspreservation.org, or visitwww.arkansaspreservation.org.

The AHPP is the Department of Arkansas Heritage agency responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission and the Historic Arkansas Museum.

Sandwich in History today at the First Presbyterian Church

The monthly architectural history program “Sandwiching in History” visits the Albert Pike Memorial Temple, located at 712 Scott Street. The program begins at noon today (February 5).  A historian with the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program delivers a brief lecture about the church before leading guests on a tour.

Organized in July 1828, Little Rock’s First Presbyterian Church occupied three locations before it moved to the southwest corner of 8th and Scott streets. Built in 1920-1921, the current Gothic Revival-style sanctuary was designed by Little Rock architect John Parks Almand to complement an earlier three-story education building on the site. The sanctuary’s main entrance was crowned by a deeply recessed arch and a parapet with battlements. Beautiful stained-glass windows, made by Payne Studios of Patterson, New Jersey, were dedicated in 1928.

Sandwiching in History is a program of the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, an agency of the Department of Arkansas Heritage.  The AHPP is responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other DAH agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission and the Historic Arkansas Museum.

Today’s Old State House Museum Brown Bag Lecture – AIRDOME: A HISTORY OF THE AIRDOME THEATER IN ARKANSAS

OSH Brown BagToday (January 14)  at noon at the Old State House Museum, the first Brown Bag Lecture of 2016 takes place.

In the early 20th century, several of Arkansas’s small towns and smaller cities were host to Airdome theaters, an open-air movie theater. Ralph S. Wilcox of the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program presents a talk about these early theaters for a Brown Bag Lunch Lecture at the Old State House Museum on Thursday, January 14, at noon. Once the Airdome appeared on the scene in Arkansas, it grew in popularity relatively quickly. By the mid-1910s at least sixteen communities in Arkansas had Airdomes. However, they closed just as quickly as they opened, and had virtually all disappeared by the mid-1920s. Learn more

Wilcox is a native of Meadville, Pennsylvania, and obtained his B.A. in History from Westminster College in New Wilmington, PA, and his M.S. in Historic Preservation from Ball State University in Muncie, IN.

The Old State House Museum is an agency of the Department of Arkansas Heritage.

Sandwich in History today at the Albert Pike Memorial Temple

Albert Pike Memorial TempleThe monthly architectural history program “Sandwiching in History” visits the Albert Pike Memorial Temple, located at 712 Scott Street. The program begins at noon today.  A historian with the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program delivers a brief lecture about the church before leading guests on a tour.

Completed in 1924, the three-story, Classical Revival-style temple was designed by George R. Mann and Eugene John Stern for the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry. In 1952 a fire damaged the southern end of the building, which was rebuilt and rededicated in 1956. The building’s monumental front facade, which encompasses an entire city block, is lined with nineteen Ionic columns. The interior features beautifully decorated spaces with ornate plaster molding, stained-glass windows, and pink and gray marble.

Sandwiching in History is a program of the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, an agency of the Department of Arkansas Heritage.  The AHPP is responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other DAH agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission and the Historic Arkansas Museum.

 

Sandwich in History at the Thomas M. Clifton house today

sandwich Thomas M Clifton HouseThe monthly architectural history program “Sandwiching in History” visits the Thomas M. Clifton House, located at 1423 South Summit Street. The program begins at noon today.  A historian with the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program delivers a brief lecture about the church before leading guests on a tour.

Located in the Central High School Neighborhood Historic District, this house was built about 1900 and features elements of the Craftsman and Colonial Revival styles. The first long-term occupant was Thomas M. Clifton, who worked in the Choctaw, Oklahoma & Gulf Railroad shops.

Sandwiching in History is a program of the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, an agency of the Department of Arkansas Heritage.  The AHPP is responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other DAH agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission and the Historic Arkansas Museum.