A GAME OF THRONES themed Science After Dark tonight at the Museum of Discovery

Science After Dark is Coming…on Thursday, April 25.
When you play this game of thrones, you win (you won’t die…you’re welcome.) Brace yourself for an evening of adventure in fantasy as we explore some of the science behind your favorite show. Admission is $5 or free for members. You must be at least 21 to enter.

-Fighting Arena Demos with Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA) local branch The Barony of Small Gray Bear at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. & 8:30 p.m.
-Dragon-like animals
-“Did your Family Battle for the Throne?” (or maybe just over cattle) Genealogy with Central Arkansas Library System (CALS) – Butler Center
-Archery with Arkansas Game and Fish Commission
-Thrones with Baron & Barroness
-“Winter is Coming” (Destroying things with Liquid Nitrogen)
-Pelts and Furs with Old State House Museum
-Sinking ships with fire Crossbows (Whoa.)
-Weapon Throwing
– Arkansas Poison and Drug Information Center
– MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History
And much, much more!!

Tickets are $5 or free for members and may be purchased at the door or online at https://museumofdiscovery.org/event/april2019/. Each Science After Dark, we will support a local charity and this month we are accepting donations for Arkansas Foodbank. You can also sign up to volunteer with us at the Foodbank on Tuesday, June 11 from 6-8 p.m. at http://cerv.is/m?0334gpyrxNj!

Presenting sponsors are Fassler Hall Little Rock and Dust Bowl Lanes & Lounge Little Rock and sponsors are Rock Town Distillery and Stone’s Throw Brewing

Advertisements

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN (or is it Fronkensteen?) tonight at the CALS Ron Robinson Theater as part of 2019 Arkansas Literary Festival

Young Frankenstein PosterThe laughs come alive as the Arkansas Literary Festival presents Mel Brooks’ comic masterpiece YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN tonight at the CALS Ron Robinson Theater.

This 1974 comic riff on Mary Shelley’s story, features Gene Wilder, Peter Boyle, Cloris Leachman, Marty Feldman, Teri Garr, and Madeline Kahn (along with a cameo by Gene Hackman).

An American grandson of the infamous scientist, struggling to prove that his grandfather was not as insane as people believe, is invited to Transylvania, where he discovers the process that reanimates a dead body.
The movie was nominated for two Oscars: Best Sound and Best Adapted Screenplay.
The screening starts at 7pm.

GOLDFINGER at the CALS Ron Robinson Theater as part of the 2019 Arkansas Literary Festival

Sean Connery, Honor Blackman, and Shirley Eaton in Goldfinger (1964)Before Goldfinger was an iconic film (with a great song sung by Shirley Bassey), it was a novel by Ian Fleming.

Kick off the 2019 Arkansas Literary Festival with a screening of the 1964 film Goldfinger, the third in the franchise.

The screening starts tonight at 7pm at the CALS Ron Robinson Theater.

Directed by Guy Hamilton from a screenplay adapted by Richard Maibaum and Paul Dehn, this is considered by many to be the best classic Bond film.

Goldfinger is stockpiling gold reserves. Bond investigates and uncovers an audacious plan to commit the heist of the century.

Sean Connery returned as the suave spy. Joining him in this outing were Gert Frobe, Honor Blackman, Harold Sakata, Bernard Lee, Martin Benson, and Lois Maxwell.

The film won the Oscar for Best Sound Effects, which went to Norman Wanstall.

 

Enjoy Lit Feast in preparation for Arkansas Literary Festival.

The Arkansas Literary Festival is April 25-28 and they’ve added some new activities and promotions…one being Lit Feast.

From April 18 to 28, five area restaurants will offer specials inspired by four of the fest authors’ books.

The list of menu items is below. Try one or all!

Visit arkansasliteraryfestival.org for full festival details.

Share with your friends, fellow book lovers, and those who enjoy a night out. I hope to see you at Lit Fest next week!

Allsopp & Chapple Restaurant + Bar
Barbecued Pork Chops and Ham Slices served with Deviled Eggs, Baked Beans with Thick Cut Bacon and Jalapeno Cornbread
Inspired by Rick Bragg’s memoir, The Best Cook in the World: Tales from My Momma’s Table

Capers
German Chocolate Cake
Inspired by Jeff Henderson’s book, If You Can See It, You Can Be It

Ciao Baci
Small plates of Polpettine Fritte (Fried Meatballs), Mortadella e Peperoni, Uova con Acciughe (Egg with Anchovy)
Inspired by Elizabeth Minchilli’s book, The Italian Table

Copper Grill
Red Beans and Rice
Inspired by Jeff Henderson’s book, If You Can See It, You Can Be It

The Root Café
Tomato Tart with Mustard and ricotta (breakfast only)
Lettuce Soup (lunch and dinner)
Soy-Sauce Egg with Sticky Rice (dinner only)
Apple Custard Crisp (dinner only)
Inspired by Dorie Greenspan’s book, Everyday Dorie.

Go on THE SEARCH FOR GENERAL TSO tonight at CALS Ron Robinson Theater

Image result for the search for general tso

Tonight (4/16) at the Ron Robinson Theater, the 2014 documentary The Search for General Tso will be shown.  This screening, which starts at 7pm, is a part of the Becoming American: Immigration and Popular Culture documentary film and discussion series.

This mouthwateringly entertaining film travels the globe to unravel a captivating culinary mystery. General Tso’s chicken is a staple of Chinese-American cooking, and a ubiquitous presence on restaurant menus across the country. But just who was General Tso? And how did his chicken become emblematic of an entire national cuisine?

Director Ian Cheney (King CornThe City Dark) journeys from Shanghai to New York to the American Midwest and beyond to uncover the origins of this iconic dish, turning up surprising revelations and a host of humorous characters along the way. Told with the verve of a good detective story, The Search for General Tso is as much about food as it is a tale of the American immigrant experience. A Sundance Selects release from IFC Films.

Little Rock Look Back: General Grant in Little Rock

On April 15, 1880, former president Ulysses S. Grant spoke in Little Rock as part of his world tour. While here he made a couple of appearances and participated in a parade. It was General Grant’s first visit to Arkansas either as a soldier or a politician.

(At the time, and through much of the 20th Century, former US presidents were not referred to as President after leaving office. He was referred to as General Grant or Mr. Grant during his time in Little Rock.)

At his outdoor speech, his remarks followed brief comments by Governor William R. Miller and Mayor John Gould Fletcher (erroneously referred to as John C. Fletcher in the Memphis Appeal story the next day). Grant’s comments were brief and flowery. He thanked Arkansans for a warm welcome, praised the future prospects of Arkansas and discussed the demise of what he termed “sectionalism” which was undoubtedly a reference to the division between the Union and and former Confederate states.

Also that day, Grant addressed a banquet in Concordia Hall (now part of the Arkansas Studies Institute complex on the Central Arkansas Library downtown campus). His was one of fifteen toasts that evening. It was simply “The United States of America, forever United.” He expounded briefly on the theme of unity of citizens from all states. He also discussed immigration noting, “All foreigners find a welcome here. We make them American citizens. After we receive them, it is but one generation until they are Americans.” He noted that he could speak much more on the topic, but that since he was but one of fifteen toasts and that there was to be music after each toast, “It will be to-morrow (sic) morning when we get through if we all take as much time as the subjects admit of.”

Not everyone was thrilled to have the former commander of the Union Army in Little Rock. The story goes that when he was parading down the street, some Little Rock women (in a display of Souther un-hospitality) sat in chairs with their backs to the parade route. But all in all, it appears to have been a successful visit for the man who was the only Republican in the 19th Century to win Arkansas’ Electoral votes.

Grant arrived in Little Rock on the night of April 14 and lodged at the Capital Hotel. He undoubtedly enjoyed some whiskey and cigars while at the Capital. Grant had originally planned on departing in the afternoon of April 15, but Little Rock leaders pled with him to stay so that he could be honored at the banquet. He assented.

Incidentally, there is an urban myth that, while in Little Rock, General Grant rode his horse in the oversized elevator of the Capital Hotel.  This is a relatively recent story. The oversized elevator was not installed until the 1980s, over 100 years after Gen. Grant was a guest of the facility.

CALS Butler Center’s The Galleries at Library Square and AETN present “State of the Art” film premiere

Image may contain: text

Join CALS and AETN for the Arkansas premiere of a one-hour documentary by Brent and Craig Renaud that captures the personal stories of seven diverse artists who are redefining the American aesthetic.

The screening is tonight (April 13) at 8pm at the CALS Ron Robinson Theater.

These artists were a part of “State of the Art: Discovering American Art Now”, a groundbreaking exhibition at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville. To create this exhibition, the curatorial team crisscrossed the nation to find extraordinary contemporary art happening in unexpected places. Be one of the first to experience this powerful story of artists working across our country, including here in Arkansas, prior to its debut on PBS nationally on April 26.

This event is FREE and open to the public. Doors open at 7:00pm with general admission seating on a first come, first served basis.

Presented by The Galleries at Library Square and AETN/PBS.