June 2nd Friday Art Night on CALS Library Square

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The Central Arkansas Library System’s Library Square plays host to TWO different 2nd Friday Art Night locations.

In the Bobby Roberts Library of Arkansas History and Art – opening tonight in the Loft Gallery is Melissa Cowper-Smith: Natural Treatment, 2018–2019

Musical Guest: Southern Frayed (country-pop trio)

The Galleries at Library Square – Concordia Hall Gallery presents “Fifty Years of McFarlin Oil: Paintings and Sculpture by an Arkansas Traveler”  He has been making art under the moniker of McFarlin Oil for more than fifty years.

Two other continuing exhibitions include “EMBRAID—Three Northwest Arkansas Strands” in the Underground Gallery, “Part to Whole: The Making of Art, the Artist, and the Artists’ Artist Group” in the West Gallery,

Image may contain: tree and outdoorAlso on the CALS Library Square campus, The Bookstore at Library Square is proud to present 50 works from the Arkansas League of Artists “Members Show” at the monthly event, 2nd Friday Art Night.

Visit The Bookstore six days a week. Three floors of books, gifts, locally made art & jewelry, plus an art gallery. By far the best place to buy used books in central Arkansas. Monday-Saturday 9am-5pm. Gallery open during regular bookstore hours.

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The CALS Butler Center for Arkansas Studies is seeking photos, video of historic 2019 flooding for future historians

Have you taken photographs or video footage of the Arkansas River flood?

The Central Arkansas Library System’s Butler Center for Arkansas Studies would love to have your help preserving and remembering this historic event.

CALS is collecting photos and video of the 2019 Arkansas River flood to document the impact on our region.

Submissions will be preserved as part of the archival collection at CALS.

Thank you in advance for your contribution to this project!

SUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS here.

Restoring Taylor House in Drew County is subject of today’s CALS Legacies & Lunch Lecture

Tommy Jameson, lead architect for the restoration of the Taylor House (among many other restoration works in Arkansas), will discuss the past, present, and future of the dogtrot-style home built in 1846 at Hollywood Plantation in Drew County, one of the few remaining examples of Arkansas vernacular architecture built before the Civil War.

The program takes place today (June 5) at noon in the Darragh Center at the Central Arkansas Library System Main Library in Library Square.

The house was donated in 2012 to the University of Arkansas at Monticello (UAM) for historical research and interpretation, and UAM began restoring the house and adjacent grounds to how they appeared in the earliest known photographs.

About Legacies & Lunch

Legacies & Lunch is a free monthly program of CALS Butler Center for Arkansas Studies about Arkansas related topics. Program are held from noon to 1 pm on the first Wednesday of the month. Attendees are invited to bring a sack lunch; drinks and dessert are provided. A library parking discount is available upon request. For more information, call 918-3030.

2nd Friday Art Night in two locations at CALS Library Square

The Central Arkansas Library System’s Library Square plays host to TWO different 2nd Friday Art Night locations.

The Galleries at Library Square – Concordia Hall Gallery presents “Fifty Years of McFarlin Oil: Paintings and Sculpture by an Arkansas Traveler”

No photo description available.Their newest exhibition features the work of Patrick McFarlin. He has been making art under the moniker of McFarlin Oil for more than fifty years.

This exhibition of paintings and sculptures follows McFarlin from his time creating works of sculpture during the Bay Area funk movement back to his home state of Arkansas as he works through the eighties and beyond, painting his varieties of Ships of Fools as well as large so-called Manic-Expressive narrative paintings.

Featured music artist DJ Mike Poe (diverse solo vinyl DJ).

Three other continuing exhibitions include “EMBRAID—Three Northwest Arkansas Strands” in the Underground Gallery, “Part to Whole: The Making of Art, the Artist, and the Artists’ Artist Group” in the West Gallery, and Ron Robinson’s collection of vintage movie posters.

Image may contain: mountain, tree, sky, outdoor, nature and waterThe Bookstore at Library Square presents the opening reception of “Southern Reflections” by Little Rock artist Glenda L. McCune at the monthly event, 2nd Friday Art Night #2FAN

Visit the bookstore six days a week. Three floors of books, gifts, locally made art & jewelry, plus an art gallery on the 3rd floor. By far the best place to buy used books in central Arkansas. Monday – Saturday 9am-5pm. Gallery open during regular bookstore hours.

 

Legacies & Lunch focuses on history of Central Arkansas Library System today at noon

The Butler Center for Arkansas Studies’ monthly “Legacies & Lunch” program takes place the first Wednesday of the month at noon.

The focus of today’s program does not stray too far. It is the Central Arkansas Library System, itself.

Since the opening of the single Carnegie Library in 1910, library service in Little Rock has evolved to include multiple branches in two counties. The story of the Central Arkansas Library System is filled with unique personalities, grassroots efforts, and visionary ideas. Historian, librarian, and archivist Tim Nutt will highlight the history of CALS and some of the important events and individuals that have contributed to the system’s success.

Tim Nutt is the director of the Historical Research Center at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

The program takes place in the Darragh Center on the CALS Library Square campus.

A GAME OF THRONES themed Science After Dark tonight at the Museum of Discovery

Science After Dark is Coming…on Thursday, April 25.
When you play this game of thrones, you win (you won’t die…you’re welcome.) Brace yourself for an evening of adventure in fantasy as we explore some of the science behind your favorite show. Admission is $5 or free for members. You must be at least 21 to enter.

-Fighting Arena Demos with Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA) local branch The Barony of Small Gray Bear at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. & 8:30 p.m.
-Dragon-like animals
-“Did your Family Battle for the Throne?” (or maybe just over cattle) Genealogy with Central Arkansas Library System (CALS) – Butler Center
-Archery with Arkansas Game and Fish Commission
-Thrones with Baron & Barroness
-“Winter is Coming” (Destroying things with Liquid Nitrogen)
-Pelts and Furs with Old State House Museum
-Sinking ships with fire Crossbows (Whoa.)
-Weapon Throwing
– Arkansas Poison and Drug Information Center
– MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History
And much, much more!!

Tickets are $5 or free for members and may be purchased at the door or online at https://museumofdiscovery.org/event/april2019/. Each Science After Dark, we will support a local charity and this month we are accepting donations for Arkansas Foodbank. You can also sign up to volunteer with us at the Foodbank on Tuesday, June 11 from 6-8 p.m. at http://cerv.is/m?0334gpyrxNj!

Presenting sponsors are Fassler Hall Little Rock and Dust Bowl Lanes & Lounge Little Rock and sponsors are Rock Town Distillery and Stone’s Throw Brewing

Little Rock Look Back: General Grant in Little Rock

On April 15, 1880, former president Ulysses S. Grant spoke in Little Rock as part of his world tour. While here he made a couple of appearances and participated in a parade. It was General Grant’s first visit to Arkansas either as a soldier or a politician.

(At the time, and through much of the 20th Century, former US presidents were not referred to as President after leaving office. He was referred to as General Grant or Mr. Grant during his time in Little Rock.)

At his outdoor speech, his remarks followed brief comments by Governor William R. Miller and Mayor John Gould Fletcher (erroneously referred to as John C. Fletcher in the Memphis Appeal story the next day). Grant’s comments were brief and flowery. He thanked Arkansans for a warm welcome, praised the future prospects of Arkansas and discussed the demise of what he termed “sectionalism” which was undoubtedly a reference to the division between the Union and and former Confederate states.

Also that day, Grant addressed a banquet in Concordia Hall (now part of the Arkansas Studies Institute complex on the Central Arkansas Library downtown campus). His was one of fifteen toasts that evening. It was simply “The United States of America, forever United.” He expounded briefly on the theme of unity of citizens from all states. He also discussed immigration noting, “All foreigners find a welcome here. We make them American citizens. After we receive them, it is but one generation until they are Americans.” He noted that he could speak much more on the topic, but that since he was but one of fifteen toasts and that there was to be music after each toast, “It will be to-morrow (sic) morning when we get through if we all take as much time as the subjects admit of.”

Not everyone was thrilled to have the former commander of the Union Army in Little Rock. The story goes that when he was parading down the street, some Little Rock women (in a display of Souther un-hospitality) sat in chairs with their backs to the parade route. But all in all, it appears to have been a successful visit for the man who was the only Republican in the 19th Century to win Arkansas’ Electoral votes.

Grant arrived in Little Rock on the night of April 14 and lodged at the Capital Hotel. He undoubtedly enjoyed some whiskey and cigars while at the Capital. Grant had originally planned on departing in the afternoon of April 15, but Little Rock leaders pled with him to stay so that he could be honored at the banquet. He assented.

Incidentally, there is an urban myth that, while in Little Rock, General Grant rode his horse in the oversized elevator of the Capital Hotel.  This is a relatively recent story. The oversized elevator was not installed until the 1980s, over 100 years after Gen. Grant was a guest of the facility.