This month’s Old State House “Night at the Museum” – Jurassic Arkansas

Join the Old State House Museum for some dino-sized fun Thursday, Aug. 1, from 6 to 9 p.m. for their next Night at the Museum!

This month’s theme is “Jurassic Arkansas!”
Nights at the Museum is an event for ages 21+ that offers attendees a chance to enjoy games and activities, libations, and a fun new way to interact with history.
Nights at the Museum take place on the first Thursday of each month seasonally, March-October, on the iconic front lawn of the museum (or indoors in the event of inclement weather).
The Arkansas State House Society hosts Nights at the Museumall proceeds benefit the museum’s educational programs.
Admission is $5; food and beverages will be available for purchase at the event. Tickets may be purchased in advance HERE or at the gate.
The museum can validate parking at the DoubleTree Hotel; all metered parking downtown is free after 6 p.m.

 

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July 2FAN – Old State House presents “A Piece of My Soul: Quilts by Black Arkansans”

Join the Old State House Museum for Second Friday Art Night, Friday, July 12, from 5 to 8 p.m., as they showcase and celebrate their current exhibit, A Piece of My Soul: Quilts by Black Arkansans.

They will have live music by Brae Leni and the Blackout, refreshments, and fun activities, including quilting crafts, and as always the museum will be open to view all exhibits!

A Piece of My Soul: Quilts by Black Arkansans, is a curated selection of the museum’s collection of more than 200 quilts from the post-Reconstruction era to the present, representing a variety of different types of quilts many of which were created by multi-generational families.

These quilts are a profoundly important part of Arkansas’s history — through their patterns, material, stitching, and family oral histories, these special bedcovers reveal the lives of late 19th and early 20th century Arkansas families

Arkansas Outhouses focus of Old State House Museum Brown Bag Lecture today

“Crescent Moons, Catalogues, and Corn Cobs: A Contemplative Look at Arkansas’s Privies and Outhouses”

No matter what they’ve been called — an outhouse, privy, necessary, loo, or even other, more vulgar names, the outhouse has long been the “butt” of puns and jokes.

And because in the post-World War II era they were often associated with rural and poor regions of the country, for many years pairing Arkansas (as well as much of the South) with outhouses was an easy source for a joke or a barb.

Of course, the history of the outhouse goes a lot deeper than that, so join us on Thursday, June 27, from Noon – 1:00 pm, as Rachel Whitaker, a research specialist with the Shiloh Museum of Ozark History in Springdale, shares a lighthearted, yet informative look at this most “necessary” structure!

Admission is free. Bring your lunch; we’ll provide soft drinks and water. Parking is available in the garage beneath the DoubleTree Hotel.

Memories of Isaac Hayes is the topic of Old State House Museum Brown Bag lecture today at noon

Memories of a Soul Man: On the Road with Isaac Hayes — A Conversation with Chris Cockrell

Join the Old State House Museum on Thursday, June 20, from 12:00-1:00 pm as Chris Cockrell, an Arkansas native that worked as producer and road manager for Isaac Hayes in the 1990s and early 2000s, shares his stories of working and touring the world with Hayes in a conversational interview.

Isaac Lee Hayes Jr. was an iconic American singer, songwriter, actor, and producer. One of the creative forces behind the Southern soul music label Stax Records, he served both as an in-house songwriter and as a session musician and record producer.

Hayes teamed with partner David Porter during the mid-1960s on soul standards as “Soul Man” and “Hold On, I’m Comin,'” and reached the top of the charts on his own in 1971 with the #1 smash, Theme from “Shaft.”

Bring your lunch; they provide soft drinks and water. Admission is free.

June 2nd Friday Art Night – Old State House Museum celebrates Arkansas’ 183rd Birthday

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Celebrate Arkansas’ 183rd birthday at the Old State House Museum’s annual Statehood Celebration on Friday, June 14, 2019, from 5:00-8:00 pm!
Learn what life was like in Arkansas in 1836.

Meet Living History Interpreters portraying artisans, skilled craftsmen, militia, shop owners, tavern workers, as well as gamblers, a medicine man, and even a magician from the 1836 era.

Play period games like skittles, graces, and faro.

Enjoy the puppet theater, hands-on activities for visitors of all ages, dancing, and live music from the Ozark Highballers!

Refreshments provided.

Free Admission!

Night at the Museum tonight (6/6) at the Old State House Museum

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The next Nights at the Museum will be June 6, 6-9 p.m. Join the Old State House Museum for a fun take on history, with plenty of games and activities.

As always, there will be plenty of food and libations available to purchase.

Nights at the Museum is an event for ages 21+ on the museum’s iconic front lawn that takes place the first Thursday of each month seasonally, March-October. (In case of inclement weather, the event will be indoors at the museum.)

Nights at the Museum is hosted by the Arkansas State House Society – Friends of the Old State House Museum, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting OSHM and its programs.

Admission is $5; food and beverages will be available for purchase at the event. Tickets may be purchased in advance at https://squareup.com/store/ArkansasStateHouseSociety/ or at the gate.

The museum can validate parking at the DoubleTree hotel; metered parking near the hotel is free after 6 p.m.

Brown Bag Lunch Lecture at Old State House Museum looks at Cherokee in Territorial Arkansas

No photo description available.Join the Old State House Museum for a lunch lecture on Thursday, May 16, 2019 at 12:00 pm.

Dr. Carl Carlson-Drexler will be here to talk about “Life and Death on Lost Prairie: The 1819-1820 Cherokee Settlements on the Red River.”

The westward spread of American settlement pushed many southeastern Native American tribes from their homes.

One of these was the Cherokee, who came to Arkansas in the 1810s, settling on the Arkansas River. In 1819, a small band moved from the Arkansas to the Red River. Their time there was brief, and ended violently following an attack by the Arkansas Territorial Militia. This presentation delves deeper into this story and teases out the complexities of Native life in early southwest Arkansas.

Admission is free. Bring your lunch; soft drinks and water provided. If you park in the garage beneath the DoubleTree Hotel, be sure to bring your ticket with you. We can validate it so parking will be free!

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