July 2FAN – Historic Arkansas Museum opens new exhibit on historic quilts

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Historic Arkansas Museum is using 2nd Friday Art Night for the opening reception for “Stitched Together: A Treasury of Arkansas Quilts” on Friday, July 12.

The new exhibit will showcase a collection of the rarest, most treasured quilts in the museum’s permanent collection with most quilts made before 1900 and many prior to the Civil War.

Tenpennygypsy will provide the live entertainment. Stone’s Throw Brewing will be the evening’s featured brewery. The reception is sponsored by the Historic Arkansas Museum Foundation, with special thanks to 107 Liquor. Beverages and appetizers will be served in the Stella Boyle Smith Atrium. The exhibits and reception are free and open to the public.

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Grand Re-Opening of Historic Arkansas Museum Children’s Gallery today!

Join Historic Arkansas Museum today (June 22) from 9am to noon for the grand re-opening of the Sturgis Children’s Gallery.

This free event will showcase a brand new permanent exhibit designed especially for kids 4-10 years old. Based on the museum’s historic site, children can interact with all the things they see but can’t touch on the grounds tour: use a skeleton key to unlock the front door of a period-inspired playhouse, pick plush vegetables from a mini garden, pump a bellows to stoke a cooking fire, and dress up in 19th century clothing.

Featuring hands-on kids’ crafts with Zig Zag art studio, silly songs with comedic duo mömandpöp music, plus a special kids’ art show and yummy snacks!

Sponsored by the Historic Arkansas Museum Foundation

June 2nd Friday Art Night at Historic Arkansas Museum

Join Historic Arkansas Museum for June’s 2FAN! Jacob Flores Music will be the evening’s musical guest. Flyway Brewing will be the featured brewery.

In addition, there will be a couple of new objects to view in our galleries. While the Arkansas Arts Center is closed for renovations, institutions around Little Rock will host artwork from their collections. HAM is excited to display a delightful wooden mechanical toy created around 1960 by Arkansas artist Marvin Warren (1895-1994). Woman with Spinning Wheel and Man with Banjo is a humorous depiction of life in rural Arkansas, made in the Southern folk art tradition.
Also new in HAM’s exhibit Life in the Western Country is a portrait of prominent Arkansan Peter Hanger (1807-1895) painted by nationally-recognized portrait and landscape painter John Mix Stanley (1814-1872), who became well-known for his genre scenes of Native Americans. Stanley stayed in Van Buren (Crawford County) for a short time, where he painted a portrait of his host, Peter Hanger. The portrait is on loan to the museum from Kathy and Adam Ratcliffe, Peter Hanger’s descendants.

The reception is sponsored by the Historic Arkansas Museum Foundation, with special thanks to 107 Liquor. Beverages and appetizers will be served in the Stella Boyle Smith Atrium. The exhibits and reception are free and open to the public.

Bladesmith Jerry Fisk to be named Honorary Arkansas Living Treasure by Arkansas Arts Council

Image may contain: 1 person, sittingThe Arkansas Arts Council will recognize Jerry Fisk, a well-known bladesmith, with an Honorary Arkansas Living Treasure award during a reception 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 23, at the Historic Arkansas Museum.

The honorary award is a first for the Arts Council. Ricardo Vilar, a fellow bladesmith from Nashville, will speak during the reception. Arkansas Arts Council Director Patrick Ralston will present the award.

Fisk, of Nashville, was named National Living Treasure in 1999. He then helped start the Arkansas Living Treasure program in 2002 by working with the Department of Arkansas Heritage and the Arkansas Arts Council.

Outside of his public service, Fisk is a nationally and internationally recognized bladesmith. He creates various styles of knives, including the Bowie Knife – a fighting knife first made in Arkansas.

Fisk’s knives are in permanent museum collections, including the New York State Museum and the Historic Arkansas Museum, where Fisk is an advisor. He also holds workshops on traditional knife-making techniques at various locations.

RAIN OR SHINE: Territorial Fair at Historic Arkansas Museum today from 10am to 4pm

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Come celebrate the Arkansas Territorial Bicentennial at this year’s Territorial Fair!

Through living history performances, live demonstrations and hands-on activities, the event is an opportunity for adults and children of all ages to experience what life was like during Arkansas’s Territorial era. Activities occurring throughout the day include:

• Pioneer games
• Living history performances
• Cooking demonstrations
• Blacksmith demonstrations with Master Blacksmith Lin Rhea
• Hand-cut silhouettes with Silhouettes By Hand
• Ice cream from Loblolly Creamery
• Quapaw history and pottery demonstrations with Betty Gaedtke
• Mother’s Day cards in the Old Print Shop with print blocks designed by Arkansas artist Perrion Hurd
• Beekeeping with Lake In The Willows Apiary
• Dance performances by the Arkansas Country Dance Society
• Live music by Mockingbird, Lark in the Morning, Arkansas,
Sugar on the Floor, Clark Buehling, and Ricky Russell
• Plenty of food and beverages, including Say Cheese Food Truck

This is a FREE event!

#TerritorialFair #HistoricArkansas #AuthenticArkansas #LittleRock #Arkansas

2nd Friday Art Night at Historic Arkansas Museum – Music by John Willis Music and the opening of “Acansa to Arkansas: Maps of the Land”

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Join Historic Arkansas Museum at 2nd Friday Art Night for the opening of “Acansa to Arkansas: Maps of the Land.” John Willis Music will be the evening’s musical guest. The Water Buffalo and Buffalo Brewing Company will be the featured brewery.

The reception is sponsored by the Historic Arkansas Museum Foundation, with special thanks to 107 Liquor. Beverages and appetizers will be served in the Stella Boyle Smith Atrium. The exhibits and reception are free and open to the public.

“Acansa to Arkansas: Maps of the Land”
2nd Floor Gallery

Based on the expedition routes of French and Spanish explorers, 18th century maps of the North American continent were vague and inaccurate, typically noting only significant rivers and mountain ranges. Early maps were often made with political and economic motives; in some instances, map makers took advantage of the unknown nature of newly acquired territories, manipulating boundaries to the advantage of their European sponsors.

Demand for American-made maps increased as the country’s boundaries expanded and dreams of westward migration took hold; map publication blossomed in the United States in the 1790s, and by 1820, the cartography hub of Philadelphia was home to around 150 engravers. Settlement of the new frontier required accurate maps, and gradually, map makers came to rely less on the hand-written notes of early explorers and depended more on the mathematical calculations of surveyors who used tools like a Gunter’s chain, compass, sextants, and theodolites to triangulate distances.

This exhibit chronicles changes in Arkansas’s place names, population demographics, and geography from the period just before La Harpe’s first explorations of the area in 1722 until early statehood.