Tonight at South on Main – John Burnette covers Dire Straits “Brothers in Arms” album

In honor of her April birthday, Amy Kelley Bell is curating April Sessions by choosing her favorite local musicians to cover her favorite artists. For the third Wednesday in April, Amy has invited the extremely talented John Burnette to cover the Dire Straits Brothers in Arms album..

Show starts at 8 pm. Tickets cost $12 cover day of show. Tickets do not guarantee a seat. To reserve a table, please call (501) 244-9660. You must purchase advance tickets to confirm your reservation.

Singer-Songwriter and contract guitarist John Burnette is at work on follow up EP slated for early 2019 release.

John Burnette has been a contracting guitarist in various groups and organizations since his teenage years, helping forge his unique style that combines the lyric-driven descriptiveness of Classic Folk and Country, the technical challenges of Jazz and Classical, and the grit of his home between the Delta and the Ozarks viewed through the tragedy-tinged glasses of a millennial in the South.

His eponymous debut album was warmly received by the international music blogging community. John resides in Nashville, TN and has commenced production on a follow-up EP with an expected Spring 2019 release date.

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Jazz in the Park features Genine LaTrice Perez tonight in Riverfront Park

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Jazz in the Park is a free happy hour style event featuring different Jazz musicians weekly from 6pm-8pm in the History Pavilion in Riverfront Park. Family and Pet Friendly.  It is offered each Wednesday in April and September.

Tonight features Genine LaTrice Perez.

A self-taught jazz and blues singer with a booming voice, Genine LaTrice Perez “captures the spirit of the live-sound era,” said Rex Bell of Infrared Records. Her performances With elegance, fun, and excitement in a jazz and R&B atmosphere,

Genine will keep you entertained by her musical journey back in time to the sounds of Billie Holiday, Nina Simone, Aretha Franklin, The Staple Singers, Etta James, and Otis Redding. Not only does she take you on a journey back in time, she moves you forward with neo-soul by Jill Scott, Lauryn Hill, Erykah Badu, Leelah James, and Chrisette Michelle.

She has two jazz projects: Self-titled, Genine LaTrice Perez on iTunes, and Cafe’ Windsong, a live project. She is also featured on two Rex Bell Trio albums: Two Faces: A Tribute to Frank Sinatra and Billie Holiday’s 100th Birthday and Let me Sing it for You-A Tribute to Ella Fitzgerald.

No Coolers Please. Lawn Chairs Welcome. (Rain Location is East Pavilion at River Market)

End of Life and Palliative Care is focus of film and discussion tonight

April 17 is National Health Decision Day.  In conjunction with that, there will be a screening of the Oscar–nominated short documentary “End Game“, followed by a presentation by Dr. B. J. Miller. The evening will end with opportunity for interactive Q&A.

The program will begin at 6:30pm (doors open at 5:30pm) at the CALS Ron Robinson Theater.  It is presented by the UAMS Division Of Palliative Medicine funded by a grant from the Dorothy Snider Foundation.

BJ Miller, M.D., is a palliative care physician in San Francisco who began his “formal relationship with death”at age 19 when he was involved in an accident that resulted in the amputation of one arm below the elbow and both legs below the knee. Drawing on his expertise as a physician, former executive director of Zen Hospice Project, and as a patient, he is an advocate for a health care system that maximizes quality of life and that minimizes unnecessary suffering.

His TED Talk, “What Really Matters at the End of Life,” about keeping the patient at the center of care and encouraging empathic end-of-life care, and has garnered over 6 million views and ranks among the most viewed talks. He encourages us to reorient and reframe our relationship to the inevitable, that which we don’t control, and brings creative power and meaning-making to death, believing that death is the agent that helps us experience anything precious in life.

Tonight at South on Main – the OXFORD AMERICAN presents UCA Jazz I Ensemble with soloist Dr. Patricia Poulter

An Evening with the UCA Jazz I EnsembleThe Oxford American magazine is excited to welcome the University of Central Arkansas Jazz I Ensemble to the South on Main stage, featuring soloist Dr. Patricia Poulter. This event is free and open to the public.

The Jazz I Ensemble is the top jazz ensemble at the University of Central Arkansas and it is directed by Dr. Gail Robertson – Assistant Professor of Tuba and Euphonium/Jazz.

This performance will feature vocalist Dr. Patricia S. Poulter, UCA’s new provost and executive vice president of Academic Affairs. Also joining Jazz I will be the band’s favorite Little Rock vocalist, Rychy St. Vincent.

Go on THE SEARCH FOR GENERAL TSO tonight at CALS Ron Robinson Theater

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Tonight (4/16) at the Ron Robinson Theater, the 2014 documentary The Search for General Tso will be shown.  This screening, which starts at 7pm, is a part of the Becoming American: Immigration and Popular Culture documentary film and discussion series.

This mouthwateringly entertaining film travels the globe to unravel a captivating culinary mystery. General Tso’s chicken is a staple of Chinese-American cooking, and a ubiquitous presence on restaurant menus across the country. But just who was General Tso? And how did his chicken become emblematic of an entire national cuisine?

Director Ian Cheney (King CornThe City Dark) journeys from Shanghai to New York to the American Midwest and beyond to uncover the origins of this iconic dish, turning up surprising revelations and a host of humorous characters along the way. Told with the verve of a good detective story, The Search for General Tso is as much about food as it is a tale of the American immigrant experience. A Sundance Selects release from IFC Films.

Music from Steinmetz, Debussy, and Poulenc Presented by Arkansas Symphony Musicians at Clinton Center

The Arkansas Symphony Orchestra, Philip Mann, Music Director and Conductor, presents the fifth concert of the 2018-2019 River Rhapsodies Chamber Music season with Debussy & Poulenc, Tuesday, Apr. 16th at 7:00 p.m. at the Clinton Presidential Center.

ASO musicians present Debussy’s Violin Sonata, Poulenc’s Sextet for Piano and Winds, and music from Steinmetz.

River Rhapsodies Chamber Music Concerts are held in the intimate setting of the Clinton Presidential Center’s Great Hall. A cash bar is open before the concert and at intermission, and patrons are invited to carry drinks into the concert. The Media Sponsor for the River Rhapsodies Chamber Music Series is UA Little Rock Public Radio.

General Admission tickets are $23; active duty military and student tickets are $10 and can be purchased online at www.ArkansasSymphony.org; at the Clinton Presidential Center beginning 60 minutes prior to a concert; or by phone at 501-666-1761, ext. 1.

Artists
Diane McVinney, flute
Leanna Renfro, oboe
Kelly Johnson, clarinet
Susan Bell León, bassoon
David Renfro, horn
Geoffrey Robson, violin
John Krebs, piano
Tatiana Roitman Mann, piano

Program

STEINMETZ – What’s Going On (Consortium Commission)
McVinney, L. Renfro, Johnson, León, D. Renfro

DEBUSSY – Violin Sonata
Robson, Krebs

POULENC – Sextet for Piano and Winds
McVinney, L. Renfro, Johnson, León, D. Renfro, Mann

Little Rock Look Back: Brooks-Baxter War erupts 145 years ago today

On April 15, 1874, Joseph Brooks, accompanied by armed men, including the Pulaski County Sheriff, went into the office of Governor Elisha Baxter demanding he vacate the office.  Alone, save a young son, Governor Baxter departed the Arkansas State Capitol (now the Old State House), and met up with a group of supporters to plan their response.

Thus, the Brooks-Baxter War in Arkansas had begun.

Brooks had faced off against Baxter in the 1872 gubernatorial election.  Both were Republicans, but represented different factions of the party.  Brooks led the Brindletails, which were more aligned with efforts to gradually re-enfranchise former Confederates as well as have a smaller government with limited gubernatorial powers.  Baxter led the Minstrels.  This group was focused on retaining power and control of state government by limiting re-enfranchisement of former Confederates.

Many historians believe that Brooks may have actually won the election, but Baxter’s faction’s control of the state machinery resulted in him being declared the winner.  Brooks’ appeal to the Arkansas General Assembly was unsuccessful.  He took it to the state courts, which was likewise going nowhere.  EXCEPT….

Baxter had changed course on his views toward Democrats and members of his own party. This resulted in him losing support of many Republicans.  He also fought with fellow Republicans regarding a railroad issue.  This led to a meeting of many leading Republicans including Arkansas’ two US Senators.  Not long after that, Pulaski County Circuit Judge John Whytock heard Brooks’ case.  On April 15, 1874, Judge Whytock ruled in favor of Brooks.

Following his ouster from the governor’s office, Baxter telegraphed President Grant, asking for assistance.  In the meantime, both sides recruited supporters.  Baxter and 200 men set up headquarters in the Anthony House, which was near the State Capitol.  Brooks and his supporters used furniture to barricade the capitol building.  Robert Catterson, a former Little Rock mayor, set up artillery pieces on the capitol lawn to defend Brooks.

For the next month, there would be many rumors and skirmishes.  Little Rock, like the rest of the state, was divided. And the conflict was just beginning.