Help the Museum of Discovery name its two new opposums

A few weeks ago the Museum of Discovery took in two orphaned opossums. While their siblings were able to be rehabilitated and turned back into the wild, these sisters were not.

Because of this, the staff was happy to give them a safe home at the Museum of Discovery. Since they have joined the museum family family they have been thriving and grow more and more each day! Once they are old enough and comfortable with people, they will join the animal ambassador program to help teach about wildlife and conservation.

The Museum recently asked the public to offer name suggestions and received some great ones! Museum staff voted on all of the suggestions and narrowed the list down to four name pairs. Now they need your help to choose the winning names!

Vote here.

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Tonight on South on Main stage – BONNIE MONTGOMERY & SUMMER DEAN :: VINYL RELEASE SHOW

Bonnie Montgomery & Summer Dean :: Vinyl Release ShowBonnie Montgomery & Summer Dean are bringing their Queen of the Road summer tour home to South on Main!

The concert begins tonight (6/18) at 7 pm. Purchase advance tickets for $7 or pay $10 at the door. Tickets do not guarantee you a seat. To reserve a table, please call (501) 244-9660.

ABOUT BONNIE MONTGOMERY

It’s easy to mistake Bonnie Montgomery for a legend from the golden era of country/western music.

She’s been named Ameripolitan Outlaw Female of the Year in 2016, Arkansas CMA Americana/Roots Artist and Female Vocalist of the Year 2018.

With “Forever”, her second full-length album, Montgomery once again delves into classic country sounds and storytelling.

It’s being recognised as one of the best country albums of 2018, and Bonnie was recently nominated as Ameripolitan Honkytonk Female of the Year and Album of the Year.

Bonnie also has a string of great supports including Ray Wylie Hubbard, Reckless Kelly, Dale Watson, and many more.

ABOUT SUMMER DEAN

Summer Dean is as authentic as they come. Newly named 2019 Ameripolitan Outlaw Female of the Year, she puts on a heck of a show! Her raw lyrics, a bare-boned honest voice, and approachable confidence is evident on any stage and set her apart from other women of today’s country music scene.

From full theater seats to a packed honky tonk dancefloor, Summer’s audience falls in love with with the country songstress and quickly become loyal fans. Summer has released her debut album, Unladylike, with plans to release a full-length in 2019. She and her band play numerous venues from legendary dance halls to beautiful theaters, while establishing a firm-foothold in the thriving music scene of Fort Worth.

Summer has opened for numerous buzzy artist such as Marty Stuart, Dale Watson, Gary P. Nunn, Sam Outlaw, Max Stalling, The Cactus Blossoms, Mike and the Moonpies, The Derailers and more.

Tonight’s $2 Terror Tuesday feature at CALS Ron Robinson – THE BRAIN THAT WOULD NOT DIE

The Brain That Wouldn't Die Poster$2 Terror Tuesdays continue tonight (6/18) at the CALS Ron Robinson Theater with 1962’s THE BRAIN THAT WOULD NOT DIE.

The Brain That Wouldn’t Die is a 1962 American science fiction horror film directed by Joseph Green and written by Green and Rex Carlton and focuses upon a mad doctor who develops a means to keep human body parts alive. He keeps his fiancé’s severed head alive for days, and also keeps a lumbering, misshapened brute (one of his earlier failed experiments) imprisoned in a closet.

The film starred Jason Evers (billed as Herb Evers), Virginia Leith, Anthony La Penna, Adele Lamont, Paula Morris, Bruce Brighton, and Lola Mason.

The showing starts at 7pm.  Cost is $2.

“The Comedy of Errors for Dummies” is special program tonight at Arkansas Shakespeare Theatre

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Two sets of twins, a shipwreck, unrequited love, and much more!  Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors has twists, turns, humor and romance.

AST Executive Director Mary Ruth Marotte will discuss The Comedy of Errors’ plot and themes in a user-friendly way to enhance your viewing pleasure of AST’s outdoor production this summer.

It will take place in McAlister Hall’s Mirror Room, UCA. The program starts at 5pm.

Arkansas Jazz Heritage Foundation annual event tonight at Atlas Bar

Image may contain: textThe Arkansas Jazz Heritage Foundation (the all-volunteer nonprofit which maintains and sponsors the Arkansas Jazz Hall of Fame established in 1994) will hold its 2019 annual event (an intimate jazz concert with special sit-ins) on Monday, 17 June (8 to 11 p.m.) at the Atlas Bar (1224 South Main Street).

This annual fundraiser is adults-only (21+) and open to the public; cost of admission is $20, payable at the door by cash/check (payable to the Arkansas Jazz Heritage Foundation).  Larger donations are encouraged, and the Foundation recognizes patrons donating at least $50/$100/$500/$1000;

Proceeds from this event (along with annual dues and donations from individuals) fund the Foundation’s ongoing educational activities and upcoming Hall of Fame inductions (held in even-numbered years).

Doors open at 7:45 p.m.

Food and beverage service will be available during the event.  Admission fee is waived for current AJHF members submitting 2019-2020 dues (payable 1 July 2019) by 1 June 2019; a new membership application (available on Foundation’s website and Facebook page) must be submitted with dues from any member who has not done so in the past three years.

Headlining the event is Grammy-nominated vocalist Roseanna Vitro (1998 Arkansas Jazz Hall of Fame, roseannavitro.com); the anchoring quartet features Joe Vick (upright bass, 2014 Arkansas Jazz Hall of Fame), Ted Ludwig (guitar, 2016 Arkansas Jazz Hall of Fame, tedludwig.com), Brian Brown (drums, 2018 Arkansas Jazz Hall of Fame), and Sam Carroll (keys).  There will be special sit-ins by various distinguished jazz artists, including other Arkansas Jazz Hall of Fame inductees.

1945 Commissioning of USS Little Rock

Following the 1944 launch of the USS Little Rock, there were still several months before the ship was ready to officially join the US Navy fleet.

On June 17, 1945, the USS Little Rock was officially commissioned and joined the fleet.  While Europe had surrendered by this time, the war in the Pacific continued.

The commissioning took place at the US Naval Yard in Philadelphia.  At the start of the ceremony, an invocation was given by the Ship’s Chaplain, Lt. C. L. Dickey.  Then Rear Admiral Draemel, the Commandant of the Fourth Naval District gave an address.

The simultaneous raising  the ensign, jack and commissioning pennant were accompanied by the National Anthem.  This marked the actual moment the ship joined the fleet.  Captain W. E. Miller, then ceremonially reported to the Commandant that the ship had been placed into commission.  He was then formally placed in command of the USS Little Rock.

The First Watch was set, followed by an introduction of Little Rock Mayor Dan T. Sprick.  Captain Miller then made an address, and Chaplain Dickey provided a benediction. The crew of the USS Little Rock was dismissed, followed by “Retreat” on the bugle. The program ended with tea being served to the crew in the respect messes.

Any member of the original crew  during the ceremony was issued a card indicating he was a Plank owner.  This entitled him to ownership of one of the planks on the weather deck of the ship.

Remembering LR Mayor John Widgery

On June 17, 1802, future Little Rock Mayor John Widgery was born in Portland ME to Mr. and Mrs. William Widgery.  His father died in 1804.  At the age of 11, John Widgery entered Bowdoin College.  He was the youngest student admitted to the college.

Widgery studied law with his uncle, Nathan Kinsman.  He married Ann L. Woodward, who was from Boston MA.  According to Bowdoin College records, he later “wandered away into the Southwest” spending time “in the Cherokee country.”

Widgery spent most of his adult life in the south. For a time Widgery was clerk of the Mississippi House of Representatives.  He then moved to Little Rock prior to 1840.  By 1840, he was Recorder for the City of Little Rock.

According to media reports at the time, several tradesman groups encouraged Widgery to run for Mayor in January 1841.  He did run but lost to Rev. Samuel H. Webb.  The next year, Widgery ran again and this time was elected Mayor.  He took office in January 1842.  On May 24, 1842 he resigned from office.  He later served as Secretary of the Arkansas Senate (where he made $8 a day when the Senate was in session).

Widgery eventually settled in St. Louis.  He later returned up north.  He died on August 2, 1873 in Portland ME and is buried there.  He and his wife did not have any children.

No known painting or photograph of Mayor Widgery exists.