Latest Quapaw Quarter Association Preservation Conversation focuses on Quapaw Tribal Pottery

1c2d437f 4244 41b6 b953 0d7bf560b583Join the Quapaw Quarter Assocation for their next Preservation Conversation which features a lecture about Quapaw Tribal Pottery by Betty Gaedtke, a member of the Quapaw Nation. The program is supported, in part, by the Arkansas Humanities Council.

It is tonight, August 8, at the Mixing Room at the Old Paint Factdory, 1306 East 6th Street.  The 6pm lecture is preceded by a 5:30pm reception.
5:30 pm (reception), 6:00 pm (lecture)

RSVP: The event is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Please RSVP .

Parking: There is parking directly in front of the doors that are marked “live”, “print”, “meet.” If those spots are taken. park in the parking lot to the right. There is also street parking in front of the building.

Entrance: Enter the event space through the door facing 6th Street marked “Meet.”

Questions? Call 501-371-0075 ext. 3 or email qqa@quapaw.com

Betty Gaedtke Artist’s Statement:

“My interest in making pottery began decades ago, but since I had a full time job with the US Postal Service, it was nearly impossible for me to dedicate the time for it. When I retired early, my husband and I bought property near Yellville, Arkansas. In 2010 we built a house there and moved to our getaway in the Ozark Mountains. I was very fortunate that in our local area there are numerous potters, many whom studied and taught all over the country and the world. I soon became friends with many of them and began personal one on one lessons and monthly group workshops with experienced potters.

I was mentored by Helen Phillips, a world renowned potter and teacher, Robin MacGrogan, a lifelong potter and professor in pottery and the arts, Sue Whittington, an experienced potter, and Marian Yancey, an experienced potter. As I became more comfortable making my own pottery, in 2012 I decided to dive into where my real passion was, pottery made by my Quapaw tribal ancestors. I took personal one on one lessons with Lisa Crews, experienced in Mississippian pottery, who taught me how to make head pots and animal & human effigy pots in Quapaw and Mississippian styles.

I have since made about 300 Quapaw and Mississippian pots making them in the styles and decorations unearthed in Quapaw villages. My inspiration comes from my many visits to museums that display Quapaw pottery and twice viewing hundreds of Quapaw pots stored at the University of Arkansas. I have read many books that are dedicated to some of the best Quapaw and Mississippian pottery ever found. I have pots displayed at several museums around the country. “

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Party tonight at the Arkansas Arts Center with film premiere, and chance to say farewell to exhibits

Image result for Delta 60 filmSay goodbye to the 61st first edition of the Delta Exhibition, bid a fond farewell to the Arkansas Arts Center galleries as they are currently configured, and see the premiere of a film about 60th Delta (from 2018) all in one evening!

Tonight the Arkansas Arts Center is hosting a special event.

5:30 p.m. Wine Bar | 6 p.m. Film Screening | 7 p.m. Reception

Join the AAC for the world premiere of DELTA 60, a documentary produced by the Arkansas Arts Center exploring the essential work featured in the Annual Delta Exhibition through the eyes of 10 Arkansas artists whose work appeared in the 60th anniversary exhibition in 2018. DELTA 60 proves the power of art to challenge its viewers – and its makers.

After the screening, join us for hors d’oeuvres, drinks, and music from the film performed live by Isaac Alexander as we say goodbye to the 61st Annual Delta Exhibition – closing June 30.

$10 | Free for members

DELTA 60 was sponsored by the Arkansas Humanities Council, Anne and Merritt Dyke, and the Philip R. Jonsson Foundation.

Documentary on preserving county courthouses today at 3pm at CALS Ron Robinson Theater

Image may contain: sky, house and outdoorJoin the Ron Robinson Theater for a FREE public screening of AETN’s newest documentary, History on the Line: Preserving County Courthouses! Doors open at 2:00 p.m.  The movie starts at 3:00 p.m.

Historic county courthouses stand as iconic symbols of Arkansas’s development as a state, elegant testaments to justice and important sentries to the history of the state.

History on the Line: Preserving County Courthouses introduces unsung preservationists and architects who travel the state finding ways to rehabilitate a building or, at the very least, fix a leaky roof to save the precious records inside. Also featured are county judges who deal with the financial burden of the historic buildings’ maintenance needs.

“The state is fortunate that the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program has helped to restore 79 historic county courthouses since a grant system was put in place to support restoration needs,” AETN Executive Director Courtney Pledger said. “The community pride and local history these structures represent cannot be lost to disrepair.”

The film visits the pristine, stately and recently restored Desha County courthouse in Arkansas City, shares stories from the record room in Madison County, and follows Mississippi County’s political and legal struggle over the viability of maintaining their split judicial district and their two historic county courthouses in Blytheville and Osceola. The documentary follows their struggles while telling stories of preservation and the importance of the historic county courthouses of Arkansas.

Counties featured in the film include Desha County, Madison County, Calhoun County, and Mississippi County.

The screening is sponsored by AETN and the Arkansas Humanities Council.

LR Culture Vulture turns 7

The Little Rock Culture Vulture debuted on Saturday, October 1, 2011, to kick off Arts & Humanities Month.

The first feature was on the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra, which was kicking off its 2011-2012 season that evening.  The program consisted of Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 4 in A, Op. 90, Rossini’s, Overture to The Italian Girl in Algiers, Puccini’s Chrysanthemums and Respighi’s Pines of Rome.  In addition to the orchestra musicians, there was an organ on stage for this concert.

Since then, there have been 10,107 persons/places/things “tagged” in the blog.  This is the 3,773rd entry. (The symmetry to the number is purely coincidental–or is it?)  It has been viewed over 288,600 times, and over 400 readers have made comments.  It is apparently also a reference on Wikipedia.

The most popular pieces have been about Little Rock history and about people in Little Rock.

Arkansas Gives today from 8am to 8pm

If you are like me, you’ve been receiving notifications about Arkansas Gives Day for months.  Well, today is the day!  From 8am until 8pm, you can help grow the love for Arkansas’s nonprofit organizations by making a donation to the charity of your choice.  The event is sponsored by the Arkansas Community Foundation.

As a special incentive to give, each gift made through ArkansasGives on April 6, 2017, will be matched with additional bonus dollars; the more you give, the more bonus dollars your favorite charity will receive.

Nonprofit organizations and other tax-exempt charitable organizations may participate if they:

  • Are headquartered in Arkansas or have a base of operations in Arkansas.
  • Have 501(c)(3) tax exempt status under IRS code AND are qualified as a 509(a)(1), (a)(2) or (a)(3) organization or as a private operating foundation.

The minimum amount is $25; there is no maximum amount you may give. You may designate up to 10 charities per transaction.

Accepted Forms of Payment: Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express credit cards online.
You will receive an email receipt of your gift; please retain it for tax purposes. Unless you choose to remain anonymous, your donor information will be sent to the nonprofits to which you give.

Here is a list of cultural organizations which offer services within the boundaries of the City of Little Rock.

 

There are MANY MANY MANY other worthy nonprofits which are participating. But since this is a culture blog, only the cultural institutions are listed.  But please consider visiting the website and perusing the entire list.

100 Years of the Pulitzer celebrated tonight by Arkansas Humanities Council lecture with Ray Moseley

Tonight, ahc-pulitzer-100-moseleyTuesday, October 4 at 7PM, at Ron Robinson Theater,  the Arkansas Humanities Council will present the 3rd in a series of lectures honoring the Pulitzer Prize in Arkansas. This lecture will honor the Arkansas Gazette which won two Pulitzer Prizes in 1958 for Meritorious Service and Editorial Writing.

Ray Mosely, who was the lead reporter for the Gazette’s coverage of the Central High integration crisis in 1957, will give the lecture.  This event is free and open to the public.

Moseley was  later was a United Press International foreign correspondent, bureau chief and then editor for Europe, Africa and the Middle East. For many years after that he was chief European correspondent of the Chicago Tribune based in London. In a 59-year career, he covered such stories as the 1967 Six-Day War, the first Indo-Pakistan war, the Greek-Turkish war in Cyprus, the Rhodesian civil war, the Iranian revolution, the fall of the Berlin Wall and the death of Princess Diana.

He was a Pulitzer finalist in 1981 for a series of articles about Africa and in 2003 was awarded an honorary MBE (Member of the British Empire) by Queen Elizabeth II for services to journalism, the first American correspondent in two decades to receive that honor. He is also the author of three books including a journalistic memoir, In Foreign Fields, and of two forthcoming books, one on the war correspondents of World War II and the other on the black American soldiers of that war. Moseley will share reminiscences about coverage of the 57 crisis, his personal experiences afterward, the end of the Gazette and the future of newspapers.

Following Moseley’s remarks Ernie Dumas will moderate a panel discussion featuring former Gazette reporters.

Today at noon – Legacies and Lunch with Bobby Roberts

robertsThe Butler Center for Arkansas Studies and Clinton School of Public Service present today’s Legacies and Lunch program which features a conversation with Bobby Roberts.

Roberts has been the director of the Central Arkansas Library System (CALS) since 1989. During his tenure at CALS, it has been recognized as one of the premier library systems in the United States, noted for outstanding public service and innovative programming. Roberts is retiring from CALS on March 4. On March 2, he will talk with Clinton School of Public Service Dean Skip Rutherford at the Butler Center’s monthly Legacies & Lunch presentation series.

A native of Helena, Ark., Roberts became a historian and archivist, a writer of Civil War history, a university faculty member, and a member of Governor Bill Clinton’s staff before taking leadership at CALS. At Legacies & Lunch, Rutherford will interview Roberts about his interest in history and politics, the transformation of CALS, and what he sees for the future of the library system, the city of Little Rock, and the state of Arkansas. This special program is sponsored in part by the Arkansas Humanities Council.

Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at 12:00 Noon
CALS Ron Robinson Theater